The Virtual Doctor is In
August 3, 2016
Triage Me
August 3, 2016

Not So Modern Medicine

“If you don’t know where you’re coming from, you don’t know where you’re going.” – Dr. Bert J. (Hans) Davidson, M.D., Ph.D.

PHOTOS: Courtesy of the Southern California Medical Museum

 

Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 2.44.17 PM

 

While our Top Doctors issue highlights the region’s top medical talent, it also focuses on the great strides being made in the quality and delivery of the care we receive. However, a look back at some of the surgical implements and techniques of the past reveals just how far the practice of medicine, and the definition of quality care, has come.

At the Southern California Medical Museum, they’ve made it their mission to preserve medical instruments of the past (some dating back centuries). For information on these medical artifacts and procedures, we picked the brain of Dr. Bert J. (Hans) Davidson M.D., Ph.D., director of the Southern California Medical Museum, who was kind enough to share his expertise on the medical instruments below.

Amputation Kit


Amputations were a last resort and few doctors had any experience in the procedures. Early amputation was the accepted medical treatment for contaminated wounds with extensive damage or bone involvement. The risk in these injuries was gangrene, a progressive wound infection that would usually lead to the death of the patient without amputation. Anesthetics [such as chloroform and ether] rendered the patients unconscious. Screen Shot 2016-07-28 at 2.44.33 PMThe surgeon had to operate quickly, usually in less than 15 minutes. Secondary hemorrhage was common and lethal.

Stethoscopes

To the left, we see three 19th century monaural (for one ear) stethoscopes, made of wood and ivory. The long one is called a “pauper” stethoscope, allowing the doctor to be further from the patient. The one to the far left is a pocket stethoscope that can be taken apart to be flat. On the bottom is the first binaural (for both ears) instrument. In the middle is a boxed French stethoscope for babies. It has two ways of listening to the heart and lungs, the “bell,” like all stethoscopes until that time, but also a membrane. Modern stethoscopes are all based on that design; there are electronic ones, but almost all doctors and nurses use a model that has not changed much for over the years.”

For more information on the Southern California Medical Museum, visit socalmedicalmuseum.org.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

Comments are closed.

F
F
pasadenamag
360
 Photos
5386
 Followers
728
 Following
We had a great time at the URB-E Derby last night and it was made even better when we came in #1 in our heat! See you all at the finals on Friday! 🏁#connect17 #urbederby #innovatepasadena #pasadenamagTwo of our 2017 Top Doctors invite you to a special Halloween Bootox event tomorrow! Call 626.537.3737 to RSVP 👻Here's a sneak peek of our Top Doctors Celebration video! Visit our Facebook page or YouTube channel for the full version. 🎥 #pasadenamag #topdoctors #pasadenaHave you visited Downtown LA's hottest fried chicken joint? Don't let the line stop you - @howlinrays is worth the wait! 🐓#pasadenamag #losangeles #howlinrays
F
Twitter
pasadenamag on Twitter
8,210 people follow pasadenamag
Twitter Pic Mischief Twitter Pic Caltech Twitter Pic prettygi Twitter Pic ACPanera Twitter Pic DevinRou Twitter Pic pcc_lac3 Twitter Pic ToddOda Twitter Pic FrankGir